Building a Storytelling Culture

A vibrant storytelling culture means the difference between whether your organization has a living, breathing portfolio of different stories, from different perspectives, that share its impact—or just a single, somewhat stagnant story. It’s the difference between having one person in the organization dedicated to storytelling (whether that’s the CEO, development director, or head of communications) and everyone in the organization having compelling stories at their fingertips. And for many organizations, it’s the difference between investing in telling the organization’s story in a more compelling way—or not investing.

Source: www.ssireview.org

Why a shift in mindset and an investment in capacity are essential in sustaining storytelling efforts.

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Three Reasons Outgoing CEOs Shouldn’t Pick Their Replacements

Apple founder Steve Jobs groomed now-CEO Tim Cook for the job. Michael Dell hand selected Kevin Rollins for the top spot at Dell. And Carnival Cruise Lines CEO Micky Arison just handed the keys over to now-CEO Arnold Donald last year. But should a CEO be given full rein to select his or her replacement? Maybe not, says Stanford Graduate School of Business Professor David Larcker.

Source: www.gsb.stanford.edu

Almost 80% of handpicked CEOs underperformed the S&P 500 Index during their tenure.

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Corrupting Silence: Companies Must Speak Up Against Bribes

In a 2012 Harvard Business School case on corruption at German conglomerate Siemens AG, Peter Solmssen —brought in to clean house —reflects on how people approach a business bribe.

“The stupid ones say, very simply, what are you going to do for me?” says Solmssen, managing board member and general counsel. “Sometimes they’ll be a little more subtle and say, ‘My wife’s going to be in Hong Kong next week, and she’s going shopping.’ Either you say, ‘That’s nice,’ and you pass on, or you say, ‘What store is she going to, and can I give you an account number?’ “

Source: hbswk.hbs.edu

Does corruption really pay? Paul Healy finds that corruption may not be as lucrative—or as unavoidable—as it may seem.

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The Pros and Cons of Bringing Back a Former CEO

The search committee forms, and vets dozens of candidates. Deliberations stretch for months. After an exhaustive process mulling all possible options, a decision is made. The new CEO is — the old CEO.

It’s a familiar scenario of late. Statistically, an uptick in CEOs returning to their former posts is hard to prove, but some high-profile cases – either meant to bring back the magic, or to clean up the mess they helped create – are drawing increased scrutiny. Michael Dell of Dell Inc. and Steve Jobs of Apple are prime examples, as are A.G. Lafley of Procter & Gamble, Myron “Mike” Ullman of J.C. Penney, Howard Schultz of Starbucks and Charles R. Schwab, who returned to his eponymous firm. Most recently, in September, former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg announced that he will return as head of media firm Bloomberg LP, which he founded.

Source: knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu

With all of the talent streaming through the corporate sector and the increased use and sophistication of executive search firms, why are companies going back to the future?

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The Lifetime Learner

A new business landscape is emerging wherein a multitude of small entities will bring products and services to market using the infrastructure and platforms of large, concentrated players. The forces driving this are putting new and mounting pressures on organizations and individuals while also opening up new opportunities.

Source: dupress.com

The lifetime learner: A journey through the future of postsecondary education

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How To Reduce Your Risk of Rejection

Rejection is the worst. It was painful when you were a child, and it doesn’t feel any better as an adult.

But there are ways to minimize your risk of rejection when asking for something you want, says Susan Krauss Whitbourne, PhD, a psychology professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

In a recent article for Psychology Today, Whitbourne offers 10 tips to avoid rejection.

Source: www.fastcompany.com

Let’s face it: asking for a favor or a raise is a nerve-wracking experience. Here’s several ways to make it less stressful.

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16 Tips for Getting 90% of Your Work Done Before Lunch

Imagine this.

By the time lunch rolls around, you push back from your desk with a satisfied sigh, saunter off to your car, and drive off to have a leisurely, stress-free lunch, daydreaming about the 18 holes that you’re going to play for the rest of the day.

This can be for real.

You can get 90 percent or more of your work done in the morning. Around the time people are groping for the next shot of caffeine, you’re shutting down your Macbook and chilling out.

Source: www.inc.com

Don’t have enough time in a day? Follow these tips to get majority of your work done in the morning.

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