2 Things I Wish I Knew When I Was 22

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There are two ways to get from 22 to where you want to be – the hard way or the easy way. I chose the hard way but I hope you will read my story and learn from me and choose the easy way. 

With a commitment never to return home again and $50 in my pocket I drove off in my beloved 1967 VW split screen Kombi leaving my parents’ house to “find my freedom”. Prior to this moment I had spent all my savings on a new engine and converting my Kombi into a home on wheels with a bed, sink, and stove. This was my new life.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

Check out these 2 things the author wished he knew when he was 22. Such wisdom – share it with your family. What would you add?

See on www.linkedin.com

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How to Be More Likable in 10 Easy Steps

See on Scoop.itBusiness Brainpower with the Human Touch

In a recent episode of the new ABC drama Mind Games, one of the characters mentions an interesting personality trait that defines the most popular people: They more readily admit their weaknesses rather than waiting for them to be revealed over time. The show is about using cunning tricks to manipulate others and ensure a positive outcome, so it’s a bit ridiculous, but there’s truth in the observation.

 

In the office, it’s possible to exhibit traits that help you to be more likable. In my years as a corporate manager and developing my writing career, I’ve noticed when people appear more likable, and I’ve tried to develop these traits myself. Here are a few to cultivate.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

Have you noticed there are people who always seem to be more likable?

See on www.inc.com

No Office, No Problem: 5 Strategies For Managing An All-Virtual Team

See on Scoop.itBusiness Brainpower with the Human Touch

Plenty of people work from home occasionally, and plenty of managers work with people in different offices. But what if no one is in the office? What if your entire company consists of people working wherever they want to work?

That’s the reality for a growing number of companies that find central real estate unnecessary. Managing an entirely virtual team can be a challenge, but a few strategies make it quite possible, so you can reap the benefits of this new model.

“It is a big recruiting draw for the right type of person,” says Lisa Breytspraak Jasper, managing partner of IT strategy consulting firm Thought Ensemble, whose 13 employees are all virtual. “It allows us to lead our lives very flexibly”–and still get stuff done.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

Your team may be in the cloud but their heads don’t have to be. Get creative about building bonds, communicating, and finding what works.

See on www.fastcompany.com

How to Manage Someone Who Rubs You the Wrong Way

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When I started my first company, I hired people I knew and loved.  I thought, Why wouldn’t I want to work with my friends all day?

In many cases that worked out fine. Then my company began to grow beyond my circle of friends. The talents required for success became a bigger priority than the camaraderie.

I was usually able to find people who fit the culture and the job description and whom I also enjoyed spending time with. But every once in a while the person I needed to hire just wasn’t my cup of tea. And while we shared mutual respect, spending time with this person became a chore, as did the experience of managing him or her.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

You can’t love everyone who works for you. Here we share how to manage talented people who you find irritating.

See on www.inc.com

5 Keys to Becoming Indispensable at Work

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There are times when every business is going through a restructure. Some companies seem to do this every few years, some every year, and some seem to be undergoing one eternal restructure!

Have you ever noticed that some people are restructure proof? Fear does not grip their body at the mention of that word. They never leave. They never get demoted. They are important to the company.

This reminds me of a story. Please excuse me; we are a training company, so there is always a story.

A big corporation hired several cannibals. “You are all part of our team now,” said the HR manager during the welcome briefing. “You get all the usual benefits and you can go to the cafeteria for something to eat, but please don’t eat any of the other employees.

The cannibals promised they would not.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

These are the 5 keys to becoming indispensable at work.

See on learningfactor.com.au

How Networking Can Make Us Feel Dirty

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Network ties are essential to advancement in organizations: they provide access to opportunities, political insight, and technical knowledge. Yet networking with the goal of advancement often leaves individuals feeling somehow bad about themselves—even dirty. The authors use field and laboratory data to examine how goal-oriented or instrumental networking influences individual emotions, attitudes, and outcomes, including consequences for an individual’s morality. The authors argue that networking for professional goals can impinge on an individual’s moral purity—a psychological state that results from a person’s view of the self as clean from a moral standpoint and through which a person feels virtuous—and thus make him or her feel dirty.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

Organizations need to create opportunities for emergent forms of networking, because people who need instrumental networking the most are the least likely to do it.

See on hbswk.hbs.edu

Managing a Negative, Out-of-Touch Boss

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The most frequent question the author get asked by the 250,000 people enrolled in his MOOC on leadership is, “How do I deal with my boss who is not only dissonant, but quite negative?” These bosses are “dissonant” in the sense that they’ve lost touch with themselves, others and their surroundings — and it’s nothing new. They come across as negative, self-centered, focused on numbers, and their employees feel like they’re being treated as resources or assets (not as human beings).

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

Start by understanding the neuroscience to manage a negative, out-of-touch boss.

See on blogs.hbr.org