Where Disengagement at Work Is Worse Than Joblessness

Germans’ storied work ethic is alive and well. That makes it even more surprising that unemployed workers in Germany actually feel better than working Germans who have bad managers.

First, some background: When Gallup asked employees in Germany what they would do if they inherited so much money they’d never have to work again, seven out of 10 said they would continue working. That number, which surely illustrates Germans’ work ethic, has remained stable since 2001.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

In Germany, people who work for a bad manager report more worry, sadness, stress, anger, and physical pain than those who are unemployed.

See on businessjournal.gallup.com

Advertisements

30 Outdated Leadership Practices Holding Your Company Back

According to the American Society of Training and Development, U.S. businesses spend more than $170 Billion dollars annually on leadership-based curriculum. My question is this; to what end? Are we producing better leaders or just more people who hold positions of leadership? What makes a leader successful? It seems like we should have the answer by now. However the sad reality is many organizations simply don’t even know where to begin. As you might have guessed, the author has a few suggestions…

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

According to the American Society of Training and Development, U.S. businesses spend more than $170 Billion dollars annually on leadership-based curriculum. My question is this; to what end?

See on www.forbes.com

Picadilo – Free Tool for Photo Editing

Discover the full potential of the most advanced online photo editor! Easy to use and free – enhance, edit and transform your photographs using the coolest effects and tools available anywhere!

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

Picadilo is a 100% free online photo editor that’s both easy to use and powerful. Transform your photos using eye catching effects, versatile editing tools and classy textures – plus the flexibility of multiple editing windows.

See on www.picadilo.com

What’s the Difference Between Leadership and Management?

Management and leadership practises were once just a subject for TV sitcoms – the Office’s David Brent, a master of ‘management speak’, was celebrated as an example of all that is bad about bosses.

But recent scandals, such as those concerning the BBC, NHS and the banking sector, have forced the debate about management and leadership up the agenda. Employers and politicians alike are now asking how our public and private bodies should be organised – and how we can prepare the next generation of leaders.

Key to the problem is understanding the difference between management and leadership, says John Kotter, Konosuke Matsushita professor of leadership at Harvard University. He fears that too often, employers use the terms synonymously.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

While management and leadership are distinct concepts, there is a natural overlap between the skills they require. Rebecca Ratcliffe explores

See on careers.guardian.co.uk

Why Optimists Seem To Handle Stress Better

Ever wondered how it is your optimistic friend always seems to be unfazed by stress? Scientists may have pinpointed a possible reason for why.

Researchers from Concordia University found that optimists’ stress hormone levels remain more stable in the face of stressful moments compared with pessimists.

“On days where they experience higher than average stress, that’s when we see that the pessimists’ stress response is much elevated, and they have trouble bringing their cortisol levels back down,” study researcher Joelle Jobin, who is a Ph.D. candidate in clinical psychology at the university, said in a statement. “Optimists, by contrast, were protected in these circumstances.”

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

Ever wondered how it is your optimistic friend always seems to be unfazed by stress? Scientists may have pinpointed a possible reason for why.

See on www.huffingtonpost.com

6 Things You Thought Wrong About Introverts

If common stereotypes have anything to say on the matter, it’s that introverts are socially awkward loners who abhor large crowds and just don’t like people very much. An introvert may not be a particularly friendly or happy person, but hey, at least they’re smarter and more creative than the average extrovert.

Despite comprising an estimated one-third of the general population, introversion may be one of the most frequently misunderstood personality traits. But the silent revolution of introverts — catapulted into the spotlight largely by the work of Susan Cain, author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking — is shedding light on the experience of introverts living in a culture that tends to value extroverted qualities like assertiveness and outspokenness over solitude and quiet contemplation.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

If common stereotypes have anything to say on the matter, it’s that introverts are socially awkward loners who abhor large crowds and just don’t like people very much.

See on www.huffingtonpost.com

What Are the Limits of Transparency?

Transparency has become a popular concept in management circles in recent years, no matter how little enthusiasm you may have for the word itself. Now the topic has been thrust into our everyday lives with disclosures, or leaks, of alleged US secret intelligence information by Edward Snowdon. Increasingly, we are asking ourselves “How much transparency is the right amount?”

Transparency is given credit for fostering trust among members of an organization, building loyalty among employees, and generally creating better places to work. For many years we observed need-to-know policies (that may have had their origins in the military) among managers of leading organizations. This slowly evolved in some organizations into policies that gave employees much more information about the activities of the enterprise and more voice in determining what they felt they needed to know.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

Modern business theorists hail the open organization, but secrets between employers and employees are sometimes a good thing. What’s the proper balance between transparency and opaqueness? asks Professor Jim Heskett .

See on hbswk.hbs.edu