The Next Generation of Business Leaders

MBAs–both the degrees and the people who have them–are an obsolete waste of time and money. An irrelevant recipe for failure. At least that’s what all the cool entrepreneurs and venture capitalists are saying. So what’s next? Learning to code and “lean startups.” Accelerators are the new b-school.

There’s just one problem though.

While creating a product and starting a company have never been easier, building and sustaining a business have never been harder. And lean is not everything. That means business education has never been more important. But first, both b-schools and companies need to learn some new tricks.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

MBAs–both the degrees and the people who have them–are an obsolete waste of time and money. An irrelevant recipe for failure. At least that’s what all the cool entrepreneurs and venture capitalists are saying.

See on qz.com

The New Résumé: It’s 140 Characters

Twitter is becoming the new job board. It is also becoming the new résumé.

Fed up with traditional recruiting sites and floods of irrelevant résumés, some recruiters are turning to the social network to post jobs, hunt for candidates and research applicants.

Job seekers, in turn, are trying to summarize their CVs in 140 characters or six-second videos.

Twitter, which was founded in 2006, isn’t yet revolutionizing recruiting, but some employers are already using it to great advantage, citing quick, direct contact with candidates and access to broad networks.

The appeal will grow as the site develops, says Josh Bersin, principal and founder of Bersin by Deloitte, a human resources research firm owned by Deloitte Consulting LLP. “Companies see its potential and they know that over time it’ll get more sophisticated,” allowing recruiters to target the right individuals with both sponsored tweets—essentially, jobs ads—and regular tweets, he said.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

Twitter is becoming the new job board, and it is also becoming the new résumé. Some recruiters are turning to the social network to post jobs, while job seekers are trying to summarize their CVs in 140 characters or six-second videos.

See on online.wsj.com

Workers Share Their Salary Secrets

Comparing salaries among colleagues has long been a taboo of workplace chatter, but that is changing as Millennials—individuals born in the 1980s and 1990s—join the labor force. Accustomed to documenting their lives in real time on social-media forums like Facebook FB +0.48% and Twitter, they are bringing their embrace of self-disclosure into the office with them. And they’re using this information to negotiate raises at their current employer or higher salaries when moving to a new job.

Not surprisingly, many firms want to keep salary information private. They hope to retain the upper hand on salary negotiation and hope to keep flawed or even discriminatory compensation systems under wraps.

But for workers, information is power, and young people recognize this. “People are much more willing to talk about pay than they were even 10 years ago,” says Kevin Hallock, director of the Institute for Compensation Studies at Cornell University and author of the 2012 book “Pay: Why People Earn What They Earn and What You Can Do Now to Make More.”

Still, revealing pay can be risky business.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

Comparing salaries among colleagues has long been a taboo of workplace chatter, but that is changing as Millennials—individuals born in the 1980s and 1990s—join the labor force.

See on online.wsj.com

Is This How You Talk? Voice and Perceptions

New research shows the sound of a person’s voice strongly influences how he or she is seen. The sound of a speaker’s voice matters twice as much as the content of the message, according to a study last year of 120 executives’ speeches by Quantified Impressions, an Austin, Texas, communications analytics company. Researchers used computer software to analyze speakers’ voices, then collected feedback from a panel of 10 experts and 1,000 listeners. The speakers’ voice quality accounted for 23% of listeners’ evaluations; the content of the message accounted for 11%. Other factors were the speakers’ passion, knowledge and presence.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

New research shows the sound of a person’s voice strongly influences how he or she is seen. Annoyed listeners often assume nothing can be done to change an irritating voice. But people’s voices can be improved through therapy, coaching or feedback.

See on online.wsj.com

These Are The 30 Most Important Women Under 30 In Tech

Women are (relatively) few and far between in the tech industry.

They make up less than 10% of venture capitalists, and they leave the industry at twice the rate of men, according to a recent study by the Kauffman Foundation. 

There’s also a shortage of women pursuing engineering, particularly software engineering.

But the women who do choose to enter the tech industry in one way or another are doing incredibly important work. 

Over the last couple of weeks, Business Insider accepted nominations for the most important women 30 years old or under in tech. They combined those nominations with their own research to give readers a definitive list and ranking.

See on au.businessinsider.com

Outsourcing Business Processes for Innovation

Many companies pursue business process outsourcing to trim costs. But it can evolve into much more.

The number of companies that outsource critical business processes to outside suppliers has been growing significantly worldwide. In 2012, companies outsourced some $309 billion of services — activities including finance and accounting, human resource management, procurement and legal services — and the overall volume has been growing at a rate of around 25% annually.

Although many organizations initiated business process outsourcing (BPO) as part of an effort to reduce costs or acquire new skills, it has since evolved into much more. In relationships companies classify as high-performing, service providers deliver substantial long-term improvements to the client’s operating efficiency and strategic performance.

These types of innovations require companies and service providers to work together. BPO providers do not need incentives to improve their own revenue or margins, but they do need them to focus on the client’s performance. While partners may incentivize innovation by using mechanisms such as productivity targets, allocating innovation days and agreeing to gain share on innovation projects, innovation won’t happen unless clients and providers implement a more comprehensive process that combines acculturation across different organizations, an engaging method for generating ideas, adequate funding and a system for managing change.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

Many companies look to business-process outsourcing to save money. But the most successful clients concentrate less on cost savings and more on achieving innovation.

See on sloanreview.mit.edu

The Problem with Predictions

People have always yearned to see into the future, to peek around the corner and make sense of what’s going on, according to author and mathematician David Orrell.

But predicting the future is difficult. And what’s more, the search for the “perfect model” of prediction often reveals as much about people’s sense of aesthetics as it does about the future, Orrell said last Thursday during “Perfect Model: The Past, Present, and Future of Prediction,” a talk sponsored by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.

The ability to predict trends has grown over the centuries, he said, but not as much as people might think, especially in a few important areas.

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor‘s insight:

People would like to predict the future, says author and mathematician David Orrell, but it remains quite a difficult thing to do, even with lots of data at hand.

See on news.harvard.edu